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Tag: Blue

18th Century, Articles, Blue and White, Blue Painted Mark, Germany, Marks

Limbach 1788-1800

Limbach Thurungia, Germany. Late Eighteenth century. Typical hand drawn clover mark used after 1788. The factory closed in the middle of the 19th Century. This teabowl pattern is not unique to the factory – but the quick strokes and confident decoration is. They specialised in quickly produced, simple wares. The teabowl’s large size fits with it being late eighteenth century. As the tax on tea was lifted and tea became cheaper to import – Tea drinking  vessels (which had been small to savour and not waste an expensive and precious commodity) became larger and larger – just as tea caddies went from incorporating locks – to simple lidded boxes and jars. Limbach factories using this mark included:- Greiner (1778-),  Groszbretenbach (1788-), Kloster-Veilsdorf (1797-) and, according to Cushion, it may also have been used by Ilmenau 1786-1792.

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17th Century, 18th Century, Articles, China, Imari

English, Japanese and Chinese Imari

When the Ming dynasty fell in the late 17th Century, the Dutch East India Company needed to find alternative sources for importing Porcelain in bulk to meet the increasing demand in the West. Japanese porcelain, shipped from the port of Imari, was cheap bright and colourful –  in contrast to the plain blue and white from China – Imari’s most noticeable export was blue and white underglaze, embellished with gold and iron red decoration. The port name, Imari, is now synonymous with this type of decoration (some Arita ware looks similar but does not include the underglaze blue). Below, this good example of 18th Century Japanese Imari is typically distinguished by the dullness of the gold embellishment, the deep dark Indigo Blue that borders on black (frequently applied with a thick brush)  and the dull orangey-red thickly (and, again, often crudely applied) surface glazed colouring under the gold. When the regular Trade routes to China

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19th Century, Articles, Black Printed Mark, Blue Printed Mark, England, Great Britain, Imari, Marks, Printed Marks, Rich Colours, Spode

Spode

Spode reputedly bought William Turners Stoneware patent some time during the second decade of the Nineteenth Century, with items classed as stoneware appearing from around 1815. Experimentation with Felspar and other additions to the formula saw a patent for “New Stone” filed around 1821, with pieces primarily featuring oriental style designs appearing by the following year. When Copeland Garrett took over the factory in 1833, the mark was retained. Pieces of this style and with comparatively early pattern numbers like the one illustrated below fall into the early and original Spode New Stone era and this plate dates from around 1822-1825

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19th Century, 20th Century, Articles, Blue and White, Blue Painted Mark, Blue Printed Mark, Denmark

Dating Royal Copenhagen

Royal Copenhagen has used the three wavy water lines to identify their porcelain since it started in 1775 – Early pieces frequently include a dot in front of the waves. The mark was not very consistently drawn, often with quite flat waves that look quite rushed- presumably each workman had their own slight variant until about 1820. Hand drawn lines usually indicate manufacture before 1885. The example to the left is pre 1840. Between 1885 and 1890 the lines are more uniform – either done with a three nib pen or as a print. From 1889 a circle was added over the lines – inside which was a crown between the curved words Royal Copenhagen. From c. 1890, export ware featured a small crown over tiny waves over the word Denmark (spelled in English) in a circle over three larger waves. The circle was dropped from non export marks. Between

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