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19th Century, 20th Century, Articles, Black Printed Mark, Blue Printed Mark, England, Great Britain, Marks, Other Colour Mark, Printed Marks, Red Printed Mark, Worcester

Dating Royal Worcester 1867 to 1927

The modern Royal Worcester mark (without the words Royal Worcester England and the dots) was first introduced in 1862. Initially two numbers in addition to the logo indicated the date (eg 63 for 1863 impressed or printed). In 1867 the number was printed or replaced with a Capital letter (starting with A and continuing to M in 1877 – neither F or J were used). In 1878 capital letters replaced the numbers completely and from 1878’s N continued through to 1888 and Z (missing out O and Q). The O was used in 1889. In 1890, the latter a appears in lowercase – clearly intending to follow the previous pattern, however, the McKinley Tariff Act meant the the country of origin had to be included on all export ware, so the logo was redesigned to include the words Royal Worcester England around the outside of the circle (with no dots

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19th Century, Articles, England, Great Britain, Marks, New Hall, Printed Marks

New Hall

After Longton Hall’s unsuccessul efforts to produce porcelain, New Hall became the first Pottery to produce a recognisable and commercially viable porcelain body in Staffordshire, in the 1780s. (http://www.thepotteries.org/features/new_hall1956.htm) New Hall is always popular with collectors. As a result, it is hard to find marked pieces that are “low budget” – and pieces with the New Hall stamp will command a high price. Unmarked New Hall, although “affordable”, can easily be confused with wares from its many competitors all using the same decorative features. The “trick” to collecting New Hall (not to be confused with the later reincarnation in the late 19th Century) is to understand the significance of the pattern numbers (and have a good reference book to confirm that the pattern number you see corresponds to the decoration on the piece). Two of my favourite bibles for collecting New Hall are “A Guide to New Hall Porcelain Patterns”

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