Recently Added

Recent Articles

Tag: England

19th Century, 20th Century, Articles, Black Printed Mark, Blue Printed Mark, England, Great Britain, Marks, Other Colour Mark, Printed Marks, Red Printed Mark, Worcester

Dating Royal Worcester 1867 to 1927

The modern Royal Worcester mark (without the words Royal Worcester England and the dots) was first introduced in 1862. Initially two numbers in addition to the logo indicated the date (eg 63 for 1863 impressed or printed). In 1867 the number was printed or replaced with a Capital letter (starting with A and continuing to M in 1877 – neither F or J were used). In 1878 capital letters replaced the numbers completely and from 1878’s N continued through to 1888 and Z (missing out O and Q). The O was used in 1889. In 1890, the latter a appears in lowercase – clearly intending to follow the previous pattern, however, the McKinley Tariff Act meant the the country of origin had to be included on all export ware, so the logo was redesigned to include the words Royal Worcester England around the outside of the circle (with no dots

Read More
20th Century, Articles, Blue Printed Mark, England, Great Britain, Marks, Pottery, Printed Marks, Staffordshire

S Hancock and Sons and other Corona Marks

Royal Corona Ware (also known as Corona Ware) with a very similar mark was made by Sampson Hancock and Sons from 1912  until 1937. Sampson Hancock was started in Tunstall around 1858. In 1870 they relocated to the Bridgeworks in Stoke. Primarily an Earthenware manufacturer, Hancock’s popular wares were inexpensive. (the hand drawn numbers in the picture are pattern numbers) Initials S.H. were used between 1858 – 1891 Printed mark S. HANCOCK was used from 1858 S. H. & S. S. H. & Sons 1891 – 1935 Other marks from this factory –  including ones using the word MAGNET or THE “DUCHESS” CHINA – all either feature the company initials or the factory name within the design. The word England was added after 1891. Warning Marks featuring a Crown with the word CORONA on its own, underneath are NOT made by Sampson Hancock and Sons – they are either Gater, Hall

Read More
About the site, The Basics

Identifying Age and Makers – The Basics

Quick Pointers for dating British pottery and porcelain:- 1) when a piece is clearly marked in English with its country of origin then it was almost certainly made after 1891. The word “England” on its own suggests that the piece was marked after the 1891 McKinley Tariff Act (a few pieces were marked in anticipation of trade restrictions – but almost all are post 1880) 2) Pieces marked with “Made in England” tend to indicate that they were made after the First World War. 3) “Registered Numbers” (Reg, Reg’d) appear in the mid to late 1880s. 4) “Trade Mark” and “Ltd” appear most commonly on china made after 1860 5) The word “Royal” on a piece suggests that it is likely to be Victorian, as does the diamond registration mark. 6) Royal Coats of Arms are occasionally late Georgian but, more commonly, Victorian. So, what about the pieces with registration

Read More