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Blue Painted Mark

18th Century, Articles, Blue and White, Blue Painted Mark, Germany, Marks

Limbach 1788-1800

Limbach Thurungia, Germany. Late Eighteenth century. Typical hand drawn clover mark used after 1788. The factory closed in the middle of the 19th Century. This teabowl pattern is not unique to the factory – but the quick strokes and confident decoration is. They specialised in quickly produced, simple wares. The teabowl’s large size fits with it being late eighteenth century. As the tax on tea was lifted and tea became cheaper to import – Tea drinking  vessels (which had been small to savour and not waste an expensive and precious commodity) became larger and larger – just as tea caddies went from incorporating locks – to simple lidded boxes and jars. Limbach factories using this mark included:- Greiner (1778-),  Groszbretenbach (1788-), Kloster-Veilsdorf (1797-) and, according to Cushion, it may also have been used by Ilmenau 1786-1792.

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18th Century, 19th Century, Articles, Black Printed Mark, Blue Painted Mark, Blue Printed Mark, Coalport, England, Gold Printed Mark, Marks, Staffordshire

Coalport

Modern pieces of Coalport are clearly marked. What is less well known is that the Factory also used marks that imitated other factories, particularly in the early 19th Century. Coalport also absorbed other factories and incorporated their marks in its own – including the crescent moon used on Salopian ware by Caughley and the S and N of Swansea and Natgarw

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19th Century, 20th Century, Articles, Blue and White, Blue Painted Mark, Blue Printed Mark, Denmark

Dating Royal Copenhagen

Royal Copenhagen has used the three wavy water lines to identify their porcelain since it started in 1775 – Early pieces frequently include a dot in front of the waves. The mark was not very consistently drawn, often with quite flat waves that look quite rushed- presumably each workman had their own slight variant until about 1820. Hand drawn lines usually indicate manufacture before 1885. The example to the left is pre 1840. Between 1885 and 1890 the lines are more uniform – either done with a three nib pen or as a print. From 1889 a circle was added over the lines – inside which was a crown between the curved words Royal Copenhagen. From c. 1890, export ware featured a small crown over tiny waves over the word Denmark (spelled in English) in a circle over three larger waves. The circle was dropped from non export marks. Between

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16th Century, 17th Century, 18th Century, 19th Century, Articles, Blue and White, Blue Painted Mark, Blue Printed Mark, China, Marks

Chinese Reign Marks

Collecting old chinese pottery and porcelain is not as expensive as some might have you believe. For example in Spain there is a love of Blue and White that spans generations and cultures. You can find pieces in most places that you look and many will be chinese. However, whilst very old and splendid pieces might horribly expensive, small pieces can still be bought with a limited budget – if you have the enthusiasm to look. The two rules to remember are 1) Having a mark on the bottom, like the reign marks in the picture for this article,  does not mean that it really dates from that period. 2) Having no mark at all does not mean that it is valueless, just that the piece did not need to be stamped to sell – so was probably not intended for export. So what does the reign mark on Chinese

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